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Submit DNA for Testing

The NC State Veterinary Genetics Laboratory offers testing for the following breed-specific genetic mutations:

DNA test for Heart Disease in Dogs:

Boxer Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC or Boxer Cardiomyopathy) is an adult onset heart muscle disease that can lead to sudden death or the development of congestive heart failure where the dog starts to cough or becomes short of breath. Ventricular premature beats (VPCs) are also common. Click here for DNA test information and request forms.
Subvalvular aortic stenosis, also referred to as SAS, is a common heart defect in dogs, especially Newfoundlands. Dogs with severe disease may develop fainting, rear limb weakness, or fluid in the lungs (heart failure). Heart failure can cause coughing, rapid breathing, or shortness of breath. Click here for test information and request forms.
Doberman Pinscher Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is an adult onset heart muscle disease that can lead to sudden death or the development of congestive heart failure where the dog starts to cough or becomes short of breath. Click here for test information and request forms.
Cheek Swabs: When collecting DNA samples it is important that food particles are not included with the cheek and gum cells sampled from the mouth. In the morning before eating is an ideal time for a cheek swab. To learn more about cheek swabs click here.

DNA Test for Heart Disease- Cats

Maine Coon cats may have a genetic mutation in the MyBPC gene that may result in the development of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common form of heart disease in cats. A DNA test is available for Maine Coon HCM. Click here for test information and request forms.
Ragdoll cats may also have a genetic mutation in the MyBPC gene that can lead to a form of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common form of heart disease in felines. A DNA test is available for Ragdoll HCM. Click here for test information and request forms

Neurogenetic- Canine

Cerebellar degeneration has been documented in the Gordon Setter as an autosomal recessive inherited disorder since at least the 1960s. It causes a progressive loss of coordination resulting in the hallmark ataxic gait characterized by dramatic overstepping, particularly obvious in the forelimbs. Onset of signs ranges from 6 months to 4 years of age and disease progression tends to be slow, occurring over several years. Click here for test information and request forms.
Owners and breeders of Old English Sheepdogs have a new test immediately available to genotype dogs for the disease of cerebellar degeneration, also referred to as cerebellar ataxia & cerebellar abiotrophy. Click here for test information and request forms.

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NC State Veterinary Hospital
1052 William Moore Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27607
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